BBC News: “steep rise in the UK dog population over the past two years”

BBC News: “canines now exceeding cats for the first time in 21 years”

The BBC tells us that there has been a steep rise in the number of dogs in the UK over the past 2 years. The Dog Trust informs us that this may be due to the number of celebrities who keep fancy dogs and which are, presumably, publicised on television etc. or in newspapers.  In order to meet demand there appears to be an increase in the number of imported dogs into the UK perhaps from Europe, mainly.
Oscar on a walk. Photo by Mark Cartwright

The area in the UK where there are the greatest number of households which have a dog is the north-east of England.  Second, based on this criteria, is Wales.  In Wales 35% of households have a dog. In the UK, generally, 25% of households have a dog and for the cats the figure is 19%.  There is an even number of cats and dogs in the UK overall at 8,500,000 each.

So the BBC tells us that there is, at the moment, a rise in the number of dogs in the UK.  What might that tell us?  Well, my initial thought is that it is due to a rise in competitiveness within society in the UK which in turn is due to the recession and trying to survive within it and then getting out of it.

Hard financial times cranks up the rat race meaning more competitiveness.  Within competition the alpha male wins and the alpha male likes dogs.  That is a very vague and rather wild conclusion which may be totally incorrect.  The rise in the number of dogs could simply be a passing trend.

In fact, the statistics which come from the Pet Food Manufacturers' Association may simply be inaccurate because they are no more than a study or survey; probably direct questioning on the phone.

Final thought: the BBC are misleading us. There has been no step rise. The figures regarding cat and dog populations are rather imprecise.

Comments

Popular Posts