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Symptoms of Feline Diabetes

This short post is exclusively about Symptoms of Feline Diabetes. There are many sites where the disease is discussed in detail and I have a web page on the condition built around the proposition that a modern cat's diet in the form of dry cat food is at least partly responsible. Read my attempt here: Feline Diabetes.


The four classic and probably most noticeable Symptoms of Feline Diabetes to people who keep cats would be:

---substantially increased appetite accompanied by:-

---weight loss (this would be particularly noticeable in the light of an increased appetite)

---urinating a lot more. This would and should be noticeable to people keeping cats particularly if you are the one who changes the litter tray.

---drinking a lot more. Once again this should be very noticeable if you are the person who feeds your cat. Water bowls will go down much more rapidly.


In addition there may be these additional symptoms:

---vomiting. Although a cat vomiting can be something not to be concerned about. This is for a veterinarian to decide but if our cat is vomiting and the other 4 classic symptoms are present then this would on the face of it be one of the symptoms of Feline Diabetes. Also see below, advanced stage.

---poor coat condition. This cannot, on its own be a symptom of feline diabetes. It is simply another diagnostic factor. For example, old cats can have poor coat condition because of an inability to self groom in inaccessible places. Or a cat may be overweight making it difficult to reach certain areas of the body. Although a cat being overweight with an excessive thirst can be an indicator of diabetes.

---apparently some cats with feline diabetes walk with hocks touching the ground.

---weakness caused by low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can be serious. A cat will be listless.

---dehydration. A symptom of dehydration is when the skin on the scruff of the neck when pulled fails to return to its original position in a normal time. Gums should be moist and tacky. This may indicate an advanced stage.

---muscle wasting (extreme weight loss).


Advanced Symptoms of Feline Diabetes (due to keto-acidosis) are:-

---marked dehydration

---vomiting

---listlessness

---loss of appetite

---coma


Symptoms of Feline Diabetes to a Cat Health Problems

Sources:
  • Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
  • About
  • Sniksnak.com
  • Felinediabetes.com
  • Veterinary Notes for Cat Owners by Trevor and Jean Turner.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Unfortunately sites like felinediabetes.com are recommended by the big pet food companies like Royal Canin and Hills. They even list it in their literature! Why? Because there are so many vets and vet techs on there defending dry food -- the very thing that CAUSES FD to be an epidemic in North America.

Dr. Hodgkin's site is the best is you want to get your cat into remission. NO DRY FOOD or treats; hometesting and giving PZI insulin based on a sliding scale.

www.yourdiabeticcat.com

I would change that link and remove the felinediabetes.com site. It is full of misinformation and confusion for people.
Michael Broad said…
Hi, Thanks for your comment. We think alike I believe.
As soon as you got to know about the diabetes and detect the symptoms of diabetes of diabetes, you should start taking the balance diet and regulary visit the physician.

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