Heavy Metals in Pet Food

I'm not going to go over this in detail because I have recently written about heavy metals in pet food on the main website. You can read that article by clicking on this link.

I am simply spreading the word. But because the required standards are much lower for pet food it allows pet food manufacturers to produce food which is arguably unhealthy under the cover of the regulations which protects them. I'm talking about the USA by the way but I am not saying the UK is better. I will check that out later.



All that the pet manufacturers have to say is that they are complying with regulations and that the FDA says that their food is safe and they are home and dry. But a study recently discussed online concludes that heavy metals in pet food is between 8 and 670 times higher than in human food. The food would be considered unsafe for humans but under the regulations it is considered to be safe for cats and dogs.

I don't see how that argument stacks up. Anything which is poisonous or detrimental to the health of a human will also be poisonous to a cat or dog. Their anatomy is very similar.

A respected veterinarian, Karen Becker, says that almost all pet food is unacceptable. She cannot recommend almost all the pet food on the market because the standard is too low. She says that one in two dogs die of cancer and one in three cats die of cancer because she believes of the food that they eat.

The heavy metals that I am referring to are such as arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury. These metals are linked to cancer, respiratory disorders and neurological disorders.

Please read the main article where there's more detail. The point is this: there needs to be a tightening up of standards and regulations and to maintain those standards in respect of pet food in America. The pet is a second-class citizen to put it bluntly. It is acceptable to feed them unacceptable food in terms of human standards. Surely this is incorrect.

If you were a conspiracy theorist you would argue that the food is deliberately of unsatisfactory quality and potentially poisonous to cats and dogs because it helps to supply a continual stream of health complaints to veterinarians. Therefore, you could argue that veterinarians are in league with pet food manufacturers. This is not a crazy thought because Hills prescription diet foods are heavily sold by veterinarians and they work in conjunction with veterinarians. As I recall, they get at veterinarians early in their careers and supply funding with respect to training et cetera. This pet food manufacturer is heavily embedded into the veterinary system in America. It's a two-way trade. The veterinarians get more business and the pet food manufacturers are able to make cheaper pet food and therefore increase their profit margins.

The FDA is silent about this as far as I know. It dismays a lot of people. Regrettably, however, the vast majority of cat and dog owners in America are unaware of these sorts of problems. I'm not criticizing anybody. There is a general apathy about the quality of cat and dog food. If it on the shelves is good enough to buy. They think that it is controlled adequately and the standards are high enough. They don't ask questions. Some people do ask questions and when they do they come up with these sorts of answers. Susan Thixon has a great website about pet food quality. Some of the articles that she writes are frankly shocking. The high levels of heavy metals in pet food is also shocking.

Very few people make their own pet food. Making raw cat food is quite difficult or people are put off doing it because they're uncertain about it. If they did it would certainly get around these health problems. People who make their own pet food swear by it. They say that their cats are healthier, their coats shinier and their poo less smelly!

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