Showing posts with label CFA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label CFA. Show all posts

Monday 13 May 2024

All 45 cat breeds created in the United States of America

The US is by far the biggest marketplace (if that is the right phrase) for the domestic cat and it can be no surprise that by far the most cat breeds have been created there compared to any other country.

America, quickly followed Great Britain in developing a cat fancy (the breeding and showing of purebred cats). It all kicked off in the years immediately preceding the 20th century. 

Created in America 😹🙀😻🐈‍⬛. This is not a distinct cat breed but a cat representing all the breeds.

The first well-known cat show in America took place in 1895 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Enthusiastic cat fanciers organized this event to promote cat breeding and showcasing in the United States. 🐾. It featured a variety of feline stars. Among them, a brown tabby Maine Coon emerged as the big winner. The event drew thousands of cat enthusiasts, showcasing both pedigreed and domestic cats.

The cat fancy was 'invented' by the English and the Americans took it too the next level. Their Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA) and The International Cat Association (TICA) are the best known cat associations in the world.

I would suggest that the American cat fancy exists thanks to the descendants of European immigrants. They brought with them their love of the domestic cat and then the purebred cat. 


There was a surge in cat breed creation in the middle of the 20th century which included a fascination with the wild cat hybrids, the most notable of which is the Bengal, a cross at F1 level between the Asiatic leopard cat and a non-purebred cat. The Savannah (serval cross) followed and there are others such as the Chausie (jungle cat cross).

But these wild cat hybrids were accepted with reluctance by the CFA, an old-school cat association. They believed that the wild cat genes made these cats unsuited to domestic life. At F5 they are fine. The CFA still does not accept the Savannah which is strange as at F5 the cat is no wilder then the F5 Bengal which is accepted. TICA accepted the wild cat hybrids.

RELATED: Cat History

  1. American Bobtail (1960s)
  2. American Curl (1981)
  3. American Lynx (1980s)
  4. American Shorthair (1966)
  5. American Wirehair (1966)
  6. Balinese (1940s)
  7. Bengal (1963)
  8. Bombay (1958)
  9. California Rex (1959)
  10. California Spangle (1971)
  11. Chantilly (1967)
  12. Chausie (1995)
  13. Exotic Shorthair (1966)
  14. Himalayan (1950s)
  15. Javanese (1960s)
  16. Karakul (1930s)
  17. LaPerm (1986)
  18. Longhair Exotic (1990s)
  19. Maine Coon (1860s)
  20. Malayan (1980)
  21. Mei Toi (1994)
  22. Mexican Hairless (1902)
  23. Missouri Rex (1990s)
  24. Munchkin (1991-Recognition Date)
  25. Nebelung (1990s)
  26. Ocicat (1964)
  27. Ohio Rex (1944)
  28. Ojos Azules (1984)
  29. Oregon Rex (1959)
  30. Peke-faced Persian (1930s)
  31. Pixie-bob (1995)
  32. RagaMuffin (1994)
  33. Ragdoll (1960s)
  34. Renegade (1997)
  35. Safari Cat (1980s)
  36. Savannah (1997?)
  37. Selkirk Rex (1987)
  38. Serengeti (1996?)
  39. Si-Rex (1986)
  40. Snow Cat (1990s)
  41. Snowshoe (1960s)
  42. Somali (1967)
  43. Tiffany (1967)
  44. Tonkinese (1950s)
  45. York Chocolate (1983)

The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), established in the United States in 1906, is currently the world’s largest registry of pedigreed cats. Their mission is to preserve and promote pedigreed cat breeds while enhancing the well-being of all cats. Whether you’re interested in choosing, caring for, or breeding cats, the CFA offers information, advice, and expertise to cat enthusiasts. 🐱

The International Cat Association (TICA), established in the United States in 1979, is the world’s largest genetic registry for pedigreed and household pet cats. Originally North American, it now has a global reach. TICA’s key activities include:

  1. Encouraging members to be cat owners, lovers, and breeders who work together to preserve pedigreed cats and promote domestic cat health and welfare.
  2. Maintaining a certified pedigree registry.
  3. Hosting cat shows that showcase both pedigreed and non-pedigreed cats.
  4. Fostering positive relations between breeders across the U.S. and other countries.
  5. Supporting feline health research through a foundation and providing resource materials to members.

TICA also administers rules for hundreds of cat shows worldwide, evaluates cats based on breed standards, and recognizes cats in various classes. Their commitment to preserving distinct cat breeds ensures predictable traits for future generations.

I know of 6 American cat associations:

In North America, several cat associations play pivotal roles in promoting feline welfare and breeding. Here are some of the recognized major cat associations:

  1. CFA (The Cat Fanciers’ Association): A prestigious organization that oversees cat shows, breed standards, and registrations in the United States.
  2. CFF (Cat Fanciers’ Federation): Another notable association dedicated to pedigreed cats and cat shows.
  3. ACA (American Cat Association): A non-profit organization that advocates for responsible breeding and cat welfare.
  4. ACFA (American Cat Fanciers Association): A cat registry that recognizes purebred, pedigreed cats, experimental breeds, and household pets.
  5. CCA (Canadian Cat Association): Although based in Canada, it collaborates closely with American counterparts. This is added for completeness! 🙀😉
  6. TICA (The International Cat Association): A global registry that promotes pedigreed and household pet cats.

P.S. please forgive the occasional typo. These articles are written at breakneck speed using Dragon Dictate. I have to prepare them in around 20 mins.

Saturday 3 June 2023

Can declawed cats compete at Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA) cat shows?

The answer is NO. I have the answer in two ways. On the CFA website they state that "At the October 1996 meeting the CFA Board of Directors also approved an addition to the show rules which disallows tendonectomy in show cats.”


Tendonectomy: the tendon that controls the claw in each toe is severed. The cat keeps their claws but can't control them or extend them to scratch. It is an alternative to declawing and almost as cruel.

So I found a partial answer on their website. But as I recall - I researched this about 6 months ago - there was no clear, in-your-face statement about declawing on their website. I would have liked to have seen one.

Anyway, I then emailed Charlene Cambell (CFA Animal Welfare - CFA Breeders Assist & Breed Rescue Pgm VP) and asked if a declawed cat was allowed to compete at a CFA cat show. Her response was NO.

Here it is:
Yes, a declawed cat cannot be shown in CFA. It is against the show rules.

Sincerely,

Charlene Campbell
So, there you have it. For the Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA) declawed cats are banned from competition at cat shows, which is the way it should be.

It'd be a travesty if it was any other way. 

P.S. there is also laser declawing but it is clear to me that any form of declawed cat is banned at CFA cat shows.

P.P.S. Charlene added later: 'If you search their CFA web site, they have written articles against declaw over the years!  That I appreciate.' Thanks Charlene.

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